Download Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook For PC – Windows 7/8/10/Mac


Rate this post

Germania and Agricola is a book written by the Roman historian Tacitus. The book covers the history of the Germanic tribes, from their earliest known history until their conquest by the Romans. The book is significant because it provides one of the few written accounts of the Germanic peoples.

This article is all about helping you get to know the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook for PC better and install it on your PC. Here are the technical specifications you want to know about beforehand:

Download & Install Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook For PC: Windows 10/8/7

You can download and install the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook for PC using the Nox player android emulator. Here are the steps you need to follow to install it on your computer alongside the step to install the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook.

  • Step 1: You have to download the Nox player emulator on your computer. It will store in the Downloads folder of your PC.
  • Step 2: Double click on the downloaded installer, click Yes, and let the Nox Player be installed on your computer.
  • Step 3: Within NOX Player, you’ll see the Play Store Icon on the top portion of it. Go ahead, click on it, and open up the store.
  • Step 4: If you’re not logged in, make sure you log into your Gmail or Play store account using email and password.
  • Step 5: Search for Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook on the search bar that you’ll see in the play store app. This will show you the app.
  • Step 6: Click on the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook and click install to start downloading it on your computer and installing it.
  • Step 7: Wait for a few minutes and NOX player will add a shortcut button to the desktop and the homepage.
  • Step 8: You can double click on the shortcut icon and start using the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook on your computer right away.
Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook App Specification
App Name: Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook On Your PC
Devoloper Name: KiVii
Latest Version: 1.0
Android Version: 4.1
Supporting OS: Windows,7,8,10 & Mac (32 Bit, 64 Bit)
Package Name: kiviicreative.agricola.tacitus
Download: 227+
Category: Books & Reference
Updated on: Feb 28, 2018
Get it On:

Download

Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook Andorid App Summary

The Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook was developed by the popular developer agency named KiVii. They have the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook in the Books & Reference category of the Google Play Store. You can find the latest version, which is 1.0, on Play store now.

As it has a hefty 227 user base, you can rely on it for the job it does. For the user rating, you’re looking at a 0.0 rating for ease of use and how well it works. With Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook latest features, good ratings, and frequent updates, you’ll be happy with it.

HwWesAUwe7TWDZfqQiRuiu77AYfBlXEcIiBha8lJu JUb3pZLblN7w2MCjr6kOMBlQ

Feb 28, 2018 was the last date the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook was updated with new features. If you want to use the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook on your computer, you have to use an emulator like BlueStacks, NOX player, and Memu Emulator.

Using these can be overwhelming. But, no worries, we’ve got your back. We’ll guide you to install the emulator and the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook using the emulator later on.

Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook App Overview and Details

The Germania begins with a description of the lands, laws, and customs of the Germanic people (Chapters 1–27); it then describes individual tribes, beginning with those dwelling closest to Roman lands and ending on the uttermost shores of the Baltic, among the amber-gathering Aesti, the Fenni, and the unknown tribes beyond them.

Tacitus says (Ch. 2) that physically, the Germanic peoples appear to be a distinct nation, not an admixture of their neighbors, since nobody would desire to migrate to a climate as horrid as that of Germania. They are divided into three large branches, the Ingaevones, the Herminones and the Istaevones, deriving their ancestry from three sons of Mannus, son of Tuisto, their common forefather. In Chapter 4, he mentions that they all have common physical characteristics, blue eyes (truces et caerulei oculi = “sky-coloured, azure, dark blue, dark green), reddish hair ( rutilae comae = “red, golden-red, reddish yellow”) and large bodies, vigorous at the first onset but not tolerant of exhausting labour, tolerant of hunger and cold but not of heat or thirst.

In Chapter 7, Tacitus describes their government and leadership as somewhat merit-based and egalitarian, with leadership by example rather than authority and that punishments are carried out by the priests. He mentions (Ch. 8) that the opinions of women are given respect. In Chapter 9, Tacitus describes a form of folk assembly rather similar to the public Things recorded in later Germanic sources: in these public deliberations, the final decision rests with the men of the tribe as a whole.

The latter chapters of the books describe the various Germanic tribes, their relative locations and some of their characteristics. Many of the tribes named correspond with other (and later) historical records and traditions, while the fate of others is less clear

After the assassination of Domitian in AD 96, and amid the predictable turmoil of the regime change, Tacitus used his new-found freedom to publish this, his first historical work. During the reign of Domitian, Agricola, a faithful imperial general, had been the most important general involved in the conquest of a great part of Britain. The proud tone of the Agricola recalls the style of the laudationes funebres (funeral speeches). A quick résumé of the career of Agricola prior to his mission in Britain is followed by a narration of the conquest of the island. There is a geographical and ethnological digression, taken not only from notes and memories of Agricola but also from the De Bello Gallico of Julius Caesar. The content is so varied as to go beyond the limits of a simple biography, but the narration, whatever its form, serves to exalt the subject of the biography.

Tacitus exalts the character of his father-in-law, by showing how — as governor of Roman Britain and commander of the army — he attends to matters of state with fidelity, honesty, and competence, even under the government of the hated Emperor Domitian. Critiques of Domitian and of his regime of spying and repression come to the fore at the work’s conclusion. Agricola remained uncorrupted; in disgrace under Domitian, he died without seeking the glory of an ostentatious martyrdom. Tacitus condemns the suicide of the Stoics as of no benefit to the state. Tacitus makes no clear statement as to whether the death of Agricola was from natural causes or ordered by Domitian, although he does say that rumors were voiced in Rome that Agricola was poisoned on the Emperor’s orders.

Features of Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook for PC

freedom to travel. He set out for the province of Britain, in a journey that is recorded in detail in the two surviving books of his Annals.

1. The Germania is a description of the lands, laws, and customs of the Germanic people.
2. The Germania describes individual tribes, beginning with those dwelling closest to Roman lands and ending on the uttermost shores of the Baltic.
3. The physical appearance of the Germanic peoples is described as distinct and different from their neighbors.
4. The Germanic peoples are divided into three large branches, the Ingaevones, the Herminones, and the Istaevones.
5. The government and leadership of the Germanic peoples is described as somewhat merit-based and egalitarian.
6. The opinions of women are given respect.
7. The form of folk assembly described in the Germanic sources is similar to the public Things recorded in later Germanic sources.
8. Punishments are carried out by the priests.
9. The fate of the various Germanic tribes is less clear.
10. After the assassination of Domitian in AD 96, Tacitus used his new-found freedom to travel.

Whats New In this Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook?

null

Conclusion

Germania and Agricola are two firsthand accounts of the Roman Empire written by the Roman historian Tacitus. Germania provides an insight into the customs and way of life of the Germanic tribes, while Agricola tells the story of Tacitus’ father-in-law, a Roman general who conquered Britain. Both are fascinating reads and provide a unique perspective on the Roman Empire.

Before we complete the guide, do you have more questions regarding the emulator above or the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook of any kind? Don’t feel grounded, just let us know, and we’ll help you resolve it.

Disclaimer

We refer the ownership of This Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook to its creator/developer. We don’t own or affiliate for Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook and/or any part of it, including its trademarks, images, and other elements.

Here at nairahubs, we also don’t use our own server to download the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook. We refer to the official server, store, or website to help our visitors to download the Germania & Agricola by Tacitus Free eBook.

If you have any query about the app or about nairahubs, we’re here to help you out. Just head over to our contact page and talk your heart to us. We’ll get back to you ASAP.

What’s your Reaction?
+1
0
+1
0
+1
0

Recent Posts